{article} How to Sprout Your Own Seeds

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This article is from Marie-Claire Hermans, whose website & blog are packed full of helpful research, how-to articles, and recipes. Her sprouting article is so wonderfully detailed and clear, that I really hope you will be able to make use of it quickly! :)

(pictured) DAY 1 – SOAKINGSprouts Soaking

Sprouting is fun! Isn’t it wonderful how the seeds burst open and reveal new life? I love watching and following the process and I can’t get enough of it. The other thing about sprouting is that anyone can do it, you don’t need much space or special tools, it is easy and exciting. But most of all: sprouts are your alive food which make you come alive!

Added to smoothies, salads or pates, they upgrade each dish to soft crunchiness and increased health. Don’t overeat in sprouts though; one cup a day will provide you more than you can imagine. Because sprouts are beginning life they have to protect themselves from being eaten before growing by toxins. But don’t let this take you off of them; their benefits are so much higher.

Why are they so nutritious? Because they contain all elements a plant needs to come alive and grow. They are packed with carbohydrates, proteins and oil. After germinating those become amino acids and natural sugars for the plant to develop. When you eat them, they will reveal their life force of enzymes to your body. It is essential to a raw food diet so let’s start sprouting those beauties.

(pictured) Sunflower Pits after One Night of Soaking
Sunflower Seeds on Day 2Even if sprouting is easy, you have to know a basic rule to be successful. Seeds need darkness to sprout. If you are having trouble with growing those small tails, think of how a seed is developing in nature. They are mostly covered up with a light blanket of soil where they can gather all their power to reach out for the light.

So if you want to see those tails come out, you have to cover them up with a dark cloth or towel or place them in a dark place at room temperature. But let’s start from the beginning.

WHAT CAN YOU SPROUT?

All seeds such as alfalfa, sunflower seeds, red cabbage, broccoli, fenugreek, celery, oats, radish, leek, you name it.

Grains as wheat grass, barley, rye, millet, rice and buckwheat.

Legumes require a longer soaking time (about 15 hours) because they are much harder. But lentils, chick peas and mung beans are very worth wild waiting for.

WHAT DO YOU NEED?

  • Any glass jar will do. Take a few jars for different seeds or grains. Or you can buy a system as you are seeing here.
  • A cheese cloth and a rubber band to hold the cloth tight around the mouth of the jar.
  • Or you can use a sprout bag instead.
  • Organic seeds, grains and legumes.

(pictured) Day 1 – Sunflower, Wheat grass & Alfalfa
Day 1 - Sunflower, Wheatgrass & Alfalfa
DAY 1

  • All you need to do is place one or two tablespoons of seeds or grains to your choice in the jars and cover them up with pure water. If you soak legumes, double the amount; they aren’t swelling as much as seeds.
  • Put them in a dark place at room temperature overnight.

(pictured) Day 2 – Alfalfa, Sunflower and Wheatgrass
Alfalfa - Sunflower - Wheatgrass

DAY 2

  • In the morning, rinse the seeds very well and turn the jars upside down so all the water can leak out and the seeds won’t get a chance to get mold.
  • Rinse 2 to 3 times a day. If the weather is warm, rinse more often.
  • Always turn the jars upside down and cover up or place dark.
  • Depending on the kind of seed, you will already notice some tails ready to come out.

(pictured) Day 3 – Wheatgrass
Day 3 - Wheatgrass

DAY 3

  • Continue rinsing and draining.
  • Some sprouts will be ready, others will need another day such as wheat grass.

(pictured) Alfalfa Sprouts on Day 4
Day 4 - Alfalfa

Day 4

  • Are your sprouts having nice tails? Then they are ready to come into the light!
  • Place the jars upside down in bright light, preferably in the sun light.
  • You will see photosynthesis take place and watch your sprouts turn green in only a few hours.
  • Keep them in the light for a whole day until they are nice and green.
  • Store them in a sealed container in the refrigerator. They keep well for about a week. But don’t wait that long; just eat them to benefit fully their life forces!

Isn’t it amazing how much alive and nutritious food you can grow of almost nothing?

(pictured) Sunflower Sprouts
Sunflower Sprouts

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PLEASE TAKE NOTE! We were psyched when Marie-Claire Hermans agreed to join forces with uncooking101.com to bring you best of the raw and living food world! We LOVE (seriously) Marie-Claire’s oh-so-detailed articles and want to keep a good relationship with her. Out of respect for how awesome sauce Marie-Claire and her research is, PLEASE do not repost her article without her direct permission. You may, however, and we even hope you will, post the link to Facebook or anywhere you like to get your friends over to the article. Thank you!

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ANY QUESTIONS? COMMENTS? Just type whatever you have to say below. We’d love to hear from you, no matter what it is. Well, as long as it is related to sprouting in some way! :)

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